Could you handle the recoil from a 4-gauge shotgun? That’s the firearm that’s featured in the above video.

According to ChuckHawks.com:

Shotgun gauges are determined by the number of lead balls of a given diameter required to make one pound of that size ball. Thus 10 balls of 10 gauge diameter are required to make one pound of such balls, or 20 balls of 20 gauge diameter are required to make one pound, and so forth. This is the traditional, and very old, system. The actual (nominal) bore diameters of the various gauges are as follows: 10 gauge = .775 inch, 12 gauge = .729 inch, 16 gauge = .662 inch, 20 gauge = .615 inch, 28 gauge = .550 inch. The .410 is named for its nominal bore size, and is not a gauge at all.

A 4 gauge shotgun would have a diameter of 1.052″. Compared the 12 gauges .729″ diameter, that doesn’t sound like too much of a difference, does it.

However, the difference becomes pretty clear we use the old system of lead balls. A modern 12 gauge would take a 583 grain pure lead ball while the 4 gauge would take a massive 1750 grain lead ball.

Well, could you handle it? The guy in the video probably did about as good as anyone could expect.

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About Reagan Wilson

Reagan enjoys all things political. After realizing that neither of the current mainstream political parties encompass his beliefs he awaits the emergence of a true small government party. Good scotch, good cigars, mechanical watches, and SEC football round out his interests.