measles1

The anti-vaccination movement seems to be claiming more and more victims of diseases that have been traditionally 100% controlled for decades.

Just a week after the first child died of diphtheria in Spain in nearly 3 decades, we now have a case of an American woman dying of the measles for the first time in 12 years.

According to the Washington State Dept of Health:

The woman was most likely exposed to measles at a local medical facility during a recent outbreak in Clallam County. She was there at the same time as a person who later developed a rash and was contagious for measles. The woman had several other health conditions and was on medications that contributed to a suppressed immune system. She didn’t have some of the common symptoms of measles such as a rash, so the infection wasn’t discovered until after her death. The cause of death was pneumonia due to measles.

This tragic situation illustrates the importance of immunizing as many people as possible to provide a high level of community protection against measles. People with compromised immune systems often cannot be vaccinated against measles. Even when vaccinated, they may not have a good immune response when exposed to disease; they may be especially vulnerable to disease outbreaks. Public health officials recommend that everyone who is eligible for the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine get vaccinated so they can help protect themselves, their families, and the vulnerable people in their community.

About Reagan Wilson

Reagan enjoys all things political. After realizing that neither of the current mainstream political parties encompass his beliefs he awaits the emergence of a true small government party. Good scotch, good cigars, mechanical watches, and SEC football round out his interests.